From Ireland With Love | What Not To Say To An Irish Person On St. Patrick’s Day

Ah St. Patrick’s Day, that annual worldwide céilí celebrating all things Irish. Everyone becomes Irish and everything turns green on this one day each year. It’s a day full of shenanigans and shillelaghs. And of course we can’t forget the man of the hour, St. Patrick himself, rocking a blue (surprisingly St. Patrick never wore green) robe while spreading the Christian faith with a shamrock and banishing the snakes from this country. With all the festivities however, there are some things I hear around this time of year that make me think, “what? serioulsy?!” Here’s a tongue in cheek take on what not to say to an Irish person on St. Patrick’s Day (or maybe any day of the year really 😛).

Happy St. Patty’s Day!

Who’s Patty? Did St. Patrick have a sex change while I wasn’t looking and is now known as Patricia? Maybe it’s our fault with our accents that Paddy sounds like Patty. So for future reference it’s Paddy’s Day, not Patty’s Day.

Top of the morning to ya!

What century is this? We don’t greet each other or talk to each other like this. Although this one could be our fault also. Sometimes we like to play up to the Irish stereotype. But don’t, just don’t go there 😛

Every St. Patrick’s Day I eat corned beef and cabbage.

I’ve recently learned where this comes from but corned beef and cabbage is not an authentic Irish dish. We have never eaten corned beef and cabbage. The proper dish is bacon and cabbage. Seemingly corned beef was used as a substitute for bacon by Irish-Americans during the nineteenth century.

So where do the leprechauns live?

I’m beginning to see a pattern here. This one is probably our fault too. We like to tell stories of myths and legends and some people can’t seem to take in that it’s made up.

I recall giving a tour two years ago and telling my group about a local cave known as the Leprechaun Mill. The story goes that farmers used to bring their corn there to be ground and they would collect it the following morning. Unfortunately the leprechauns aren’t doing much business now and they’re only grinding corn for their own kind. Legend has it that you can still hear the rumblings of the mill but not believers maintain that it’s just the sound of the water passing underground by the cave.

After the tour one of the people in my group asked me what do these leprechauns look like. I explained how they’re small people with red hair and beards and they wear a green coat, trousers and top hat, but they don’t exist. She looked a little confused and said that I just told her that they lived at the Leprechaun Mill. I said yes but it’s just a myth, a legend. I thought she might be joking with with but no, she was deadly serious.

It would be interesting if these little creatures did exist. There would be a lot more people chasing the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. But just to reiterate, leprechauns do not exist!

?????

This last one I’ll give over to you. I want you to tell me if anyone has ever said anything to you about being Irish that slightly annoyed you or if you’ve ever said anything to an Irish person about Irish stereotypes. Spill the beans, you know you want to 😉

Do you enjoy St. Patrick’s Day? Have you ever celebrated it in Ireland? Have you ever said any of these to an Irish person? If you’re Irish have you ever had any of these said to you? Do you have any Irish ancestry? Happy St. Patrick’s Day wherever you are in the world!

St. Patrick's Day, the one day a year where everyone wants to be Irish. Here's a tongue in cheek take on what not to say to an Irish person on St. Patrick's Day.

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